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Category: Chinese-American

Crystal Lee | Military Intervention in Syria | Don’t people listen?

Crystal Lee | Military Intervention in Syria | Don’t people listen?

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Don’t people pay attention?

Hey! I am asking if people pay attention?

Hello?! Are you paying attention?

The headline reads “Miss California wants American military intervention in Syria.”

I am only 5-years old and even I KNOW better than that.

Miss California Crystal Lee doesn’t want military intervention. She wants prevention.

Nobody wants to hit anybody else with a big weapon. Nobody wants to start a fight. Nobody wants to send their brothers and sisters where they might get hurt and hurt others.

What she said,

I believe that, as one of the most powerful countries in the world, we do have an ethical obligation to prevent a leader of a country, who is using chemical weapons on his people.

I believe we should use Congressional support if we can and refer to the UN, because this is something that we all need to handle together.

What I hear/read is strong people have a responsibility to keep bullies from being bullies.

When somebody goes all stupid, lets call up our friends and other people who know better and make sure we are thinking straight. Then lets stop stupid people from being stupid again.

My daddy was in China once. He came upon a woman who was being beaten by her husband, right in front of him. The woman cried out, “Help me. Make him stop.”

What do you think my daddy should have done.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

Getting out of your comfort zone – daddy is a boothie

Getting out of your comfort zone – daddy is a boothie

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Daddy says sometimes you have to get out of your comfort zone.

I think that means you have to do things you are not used to sometimes.

Daddy says it will help you stretch, be more flexible, be more adaptable.

I guess those are good things. I’ll know better when I grow up.

Daddy says he is not a super friendly, warm and fuzzy guy.

But when he went to Bangkok to talk about Social Media to a bunch of hospital managers, doctors, nurses and such the organizers gave him a booth.

That meant he had to stand/sit and smile while people walked by. And he had to start up a conversation.

“Way way out of my comfort zone. Not that I can’t do it. Or am not good at it. I just don’t want to do it.”

Daddy says that sitting in a booth and trying to reach people is pushing himself on people = push, outbound marketing.

He likes to create value and when he does that, people find him = pull, inbound marketing.

This is what he taught to the group in Asia. But while he was doing that, he found himself in the very position that he says doesn’t work.

I wonder if daddy was out of his comfort zone or if he was just doing something he didn’t like.

Have you ever been out of your comfort zone?

Please share below.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

Silicon Valley Syndrome | Sitting is the new smoking | 6-step Prevention

Silicon Valley Syndrome | Sitting is the new smoking | 6-step Prevention

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Silicon Valley Syndrome
Silicon Valley Syndrome

California has worked very hard to get smoking out of the culture here.

I think the next step is to have “No Sitting” signs posted here, there and everywhere.

Silicon Valley syndrome?

60% = 3 out of every 5 people sitting at a table working on their computers have pain in some way. Their health is affected for worse.

36% of people get eye strain. (This happened to daddy. Found out he was wearing the wrong glasses.)

30% have back pain.

27% have neck pain.

More women are affected by Silicon Valley Syndrome than men. 63% versus 56%.

Young people 18-34 were three times as likely as old people, over 45, to do something about it, as in put down their mobile devices and go play.

The solution comes in 6 steps.

1. Stand up – there’s a guy who stands up at tall desk in the office where daddy works. Daddy calls him his hero.

2. Move more – not too and back from the refrigerator.

3. Get outside – not walking back and forth to the nearby bakery.

4. Digital detox – a sabbath day from all things techie.

5. Connect – meet people offline. Stand up when you do it. Or go for a walk with them when you do it.

6. Set boundaries – set no before and no after times for going online in any form.

Daddy was checking his email under the covers this morning so the screen wouldn’t wake up mommy.

Daddy, are you reading?

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

 

3 Lessons from Jeremy Lin at Identity Unleashed

3 Lessons from Jeremy Lin at Identity Unleashed

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Identity Unleashed
Identity Unleashed

My daddy went to hear Jeremy Lin speak at Identity Unleashed in the Cow Palace.

Daddy said there were no cows there. But there were lots and lots of young people and that he (daddy) was old enough to make up for 3 young people.

Jeremy Lin spoke.

Jeremy spoke about the 3 things most people hope for to be happy.

1. Money.

2. World Fame

3. Approval of the crowds.

Jeremy says he has more money now than he ever could have dreamed of. The Rockets are paying him $25 million. And that has made him no more happy than he was before. He still likes In-n-Out Burgers, McDonald’s and Krispy Kreme donuts.

He said at one point he was no doubt the most famous athlete in the world! Can you say Linsanity? And it didn’t make him any happier than he was before.

Finally no matter how hard he tried he couldn’t please everybody. And he tried so hard that he lost himself in the trying.

Jeremy, for what it’s worth, crowds are mean. The loudest voices are the ones who are the meanest – justified or not.

My daddy has been working online for a very long time and lots and lots of people have visited his sites. Most of the time, people just have mean things to say.

Daddy says he just does his best and leaves the results to God.

Daddy says you said pretty much the same thing.

It’s good that you learn this early in life. Now, don’t forget.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.