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Category: Lessons Learned

13 Positive Personality Traits of Princess Pocahontas Worth Developing

13 Positive Personality Traits of Princess Pocahontas Worth Developing

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Pocahontas was tough to find at Disneyland. Okay, think impossible. When we visited Disney World we were told that we MIGHT find her in the Animal Kingdom. When daddy and I thought about it it made sense. But we didn’t have time to go to the Magic Kingdom AND Epcot Center AND the Animal Kingdom.

But … we did come upon Pocahontas one day when I was a very little girl when we were between Adventure Land and Frontier Land at Disneyland. I have proof.

Finding Pocahontas in Frontierland
Finding Pocahontas in Frontier Land

Pocahontas is harder to catch than the wind because she is:

Naughty One – she disobeyed her father. And look where that got her.

Free-spirited – not to be forced into a mold. She lived her own life, took the stream less sailed.

Independent – lives her own life

Related: Personality traits of Mulan worth developing

Responsible – watches out for the animals around her

Adventurous – experiences all that life has to offer

Creation loving – enjoys the world she is born in to

Spiritual – understands there is more to life than what you see and touch

Wise – not sophisticated in an Eastern sense, but still very insightful

Noble – uncompromising for her own benefit

Brave – will stand up to anyone

Athletic – climbs, runs, jumps, dives, swim

Skillful – look mom, no hands … but still she can do

Strong – None of this, ‘well I am a woman’ stuff.

Pocahontas has a lot to offer for little girls to look up to. Starting with me.
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Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – nothing beats experience

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – nothing beats experience

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Ultrarunning and Life's Lessons
Ultrarunning and Life’s Lessons

Try as hard as he might, my ex-triathlete, ex-ultrarunning daddy just might not be able to teach me this lesson.

It seems there are some things that can’t be taught. They have to be learned.

The lesson:

“Nothing beats experience.”

I guess it’s the difference between head knowledge and going through something firsthand.

Somebody can tell you something is hard to do, but you can’t know what hard means to you until you have tried for yourself.

Daddy says some people think some things are hard when they are really hard. It’s just a matter of breaking the project down into little pieces and going at getting them done little by little. But that’s probably a different lesson for a different day.

Daddy says that he likes when I make mistakes. As long as I don’t make a mistake that will hurt me permanently or make a mistake that I can’t recover from.

He says sometimes we learn more from our mistakes than from our successes. We just don’t want our mistakes to damage us so bad we can’t recover.

I guess it means I just have to try some things for myself. And then I can know how hard is hard, how far is far, how many is many and how long is long. Because these things are going to be different for me than they are for others.

Experience – bring it on!

 

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – minding the details

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – minding the details

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Ultrarunning and Life's Lessons
Ultrarunning and Life’s Lessons

Continuing on in this series of lessons learned by my daddy when he was a triathlete and ultrarunner, this next lesson made me giggle out loud.

But I get it.

The lesson is:

“Apply Vaseline to your armpits and thighs,” and other sensitive places.

Triathletes and ultrarunners probably think they are tough. And they probably are tougher than the average bear.

But there is no reason to be tough when you don’t have to be.

I think rubbing your armpits and thighs till they get super red probably hurts a lot.

And putting on some Vaseline gooey BEFORE the event can prevent that.

Makes sense.

I think the lesson here is to think ahead. Take care of the details before so that the details don’t ruin you or your race.

Us girls have other places that might need Vaseline, too! I wanted to tell Daddy this but he doesn’t do these super runs anymore.

And besides, I don’t think he is teaching me how to run. He is teaching me to learn lessons about living a long life from running these long events.

Vaseline – this one makes sense.

I wonder what other details might be overlooked.

Wait – that’s it. It’s not about Vaseline. It’s about paying attention to details. And this is just one of them.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

 

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – the school of hard knocks

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – the school of hard knocks

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Ultrarunning and Life's Lessons
Ultrarunning and Life’s Lessons

Daddy says he has learned a lot of things in the school of Fort Knox. (Ed. school of hard knocks).

My daddy used to do these things called super marathons, sometimes called ultra-marathons.

He said people ran too fast when they ran ‘only’ 26+ miles and he couldn’t keep up.

He preferred to run more and more AFTER people were tired out. Kind of like the turtle and bunny story … only daddy ran far instead of short.

Daddy says growing up is a marathon event, not a sprint. In other words life takes a long time to finish, can’t be rushed.

While daddy was doing these ultra-running events he read  a lot. He reads a lot now. I mean a lot a lot. I don’t know how much he read then. But he read, he says. Anyway…

Daddy said that while he ran he gathered ‘nuggets.’ Golden ideas, lessons. He learned things ‘on the run’ and while preparing to run. I wonder how did he read while running. I’ll ask him.

He saved up his thoughts, wrote them down, printed them out. Remember when people used to do those kinds of things?

My life is ahead of me. Daddy says he still has a bit left in him.

Now he wants to share some of the lessons he learned with me. Put them here at my blog for me to read at some other time when I am ready.

It seems to me these marathon and ultra-marathon lessons would be worth learning now instead of re-learning something daddy already learned.  In that way, I can learn new lessons and add to his list.

Daddy says Stan will tell you more about Ultras then you might want to know.

Am I too smart for my own good already?

I don’t think so. Do you?

What about some of the life lessons you have learned? That your daddy learned?

Wanna share? Tell me in the comments, please.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.