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My daddy’s a King Kong-sized big monkey

My daddy’s a King Kong-sized big monkey

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

My daddy is a King Kong-sized big monkey and I have proof.

Last week he went missing. That happens sometimes.

Mommy said he went to eat a big apple. I am not sure why he had to go away for a few days to do that. But, it doesn’t matter because I trust my daddy.

Wilby in the Big Apple

While eating the big apple, a pear and lee (Ed: apparently) daddy and the oversize fruit did not agree.

The apple turned him into a

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Getting out of your comfort zone – daddy is a boothie

Getting out of your comfort zone – daddy is a boothie

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Daddy says sometimes you have to get out of your comfort zone.

I think that means you have to do things you are not used to sometimes.

Daddy says it will help you stretch, be more flexible, be more adaptable.

I guess those are good things. I’ll know better when I grow up.

Daddy says he is not a super friendly, warm and fuzzy guy.

But when he went to Bangkok to talk about Social Media to a bunch of hospital managers, doctors, nurses and such the organizers gave him a booth.

That meant he had to stand/sit and smile while people walked by. And he had to start up a conversation.

“Way way out of my comfort zone. Not that I can’t do it. Or am not good at it. I just don’t want to do it.”

Daddy says that sitting in a booth and trying to reach people is pushing himself on people = push, outbound marketing.

He likes to create value and when he does that, people find him = pull, inbound marketing.

This is what he taught to the group in Asia. But while he was doing that, he found himself in the very position that he says doesn’t work.

I wonder if daddy was out of his comfort zone or if he was just doing something he didn’t like.

Have you ever been out of your comfort zone?

Please share below.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – minding the details

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – minding the details

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Ultrarunning and Life's Lessons
Ultrarunning and Life’s Lessons

Continuing on in this series of lessons learned by my daddy when he was a triathlete and ultrarunner, this next lesson made me giggle out loud.

But I get it.

The lesson is:

“Apply Vaseline to your armpits and thighs,” and other sensitive places.

Triathletes and ultrarunners probably think they are tough. And they probably are tougher than the average bear.

But there is no reason to be tough when you don’t have to be.

I think rubbing your armpits and thighs till they get super red probably hurts a lot.

And putting on some Vaseline gooey BEFORE the event can prevent that.

Makes sense.

I think the lesson here is to think ahead. Take care of the details before so that the details don’t ruin you or your race.

Us girls have other places that might need Vaseline, too! I wanted to tell Daddy this but he doesn’t do these super runs anymore.

And besides, I don’t think he is teaching me how to run. He is teaching me to learn lessons about living a long life from running these long events.

Vaseline – this one makes sense.

I wonder what other details might be overlooked.

Wait – that’s it. It’s not about Vaseline. It’s about paying attention to details. And this is just one of them.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

 

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – the school of hard knocks

Growing up is a marathon, not a sprint – the school of hard knocks

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Ultrarunning and Life's Lessons
Ultrarunning and Life’s Lessons

Daddy says he has learned a lot of things in the school of Fort Knox. (Ed. school of hard knocks).

My daddy used to do these things called super marathons, sometimes called ultra-marathons.

He said people ran too fast when they ran ‘only’ 26+ miles and he couldn’t keep up.

He preferred to run more and more AFTER people were tired out. Kind of like the turtle and bunny story … only daddy ran far instead of short.

Daddy says growing up is a marathon event, not a sprint. In other words life takes a long time to finish, can’t be rushed.

While daddy was doing these ultra-running events he read  a lot. He reads a lot now. I mean a lot a lot. I don’t know how much he read then. But he read, he says. Anyway…

Daddy said that while he ran he gathered ‘nuggets.’ Golden ideas, lessons. He learned things ‘on the run’ and while preparing to run. I wonder how did he read while running. I’ll ask him.

He saved up his thoughts, wrote them down, printed them out. Remember when people used to do those kinds of things?

My life is ahead of me. Daddy says he still has a bit left in him.

Now he wants to share some of the lessons he learned with me. Put them here at my blog for me to read at some other time when I am ready.

It seems to me these marathon and ultra-marathon lessons would be worth learning now instead of re-learning something daddy already learned.  In that way, I can learn new lessons and add to his list.

Daddy says Stan will tell you more about Ultras then you might want to know.

Am I too smart for my own good already?

I don’t think so. Do you?

What about some of the life lessons you have learned? That your daddy learned?

Wanna share? Tell me in the comments, please.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.