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Korean Food | Why You Never Eat Kimchi on a Bus

Korean Food | Why You Never Eat Kimchi on a Bus

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Korean Bibimbap
Korean Bibimbap

This story is a bit nasty. True. But nasty.

Daddy went on a trip to Thailand not long ago, via Korea on a Korean airplane.

The way you can tell where an airplane is from is by what language the plane speaks. Or sometimes by its name.

“Hi. I’m Park. I am from Korea. Can I give you a lift?”

They served kimchi on the airplane.

Daddy said it reminded him of a story a missionary friend who lived in Korea once told him.

She said, “I was on a bus. When suddenly I looked down and there was food on the floor. I feared I had bumped the little girl and she had dropped her kimchi. I reached down, scooped it up as quickly as I could and tried to give it back to the mother. The mother was very very angry. It turns out the little girl had lost her lunch. (That’s what I thought). But in this case, lost her lunch meant she had thrown up the kimchi after eating it one time already. I couldn’t tell the difference.”

Yikes!!! Can’t tell the difference between kimchi that has been eaten once and hasn’t been eaten yet?

That’s a true story.

And that’s why daddy never eats kimchi unless he knows for absolute sure it hasn’t been eaten already one time.

Airplanes are also sometimes called air buses. Daddy skipped his kimchi this time, just in case.

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

 

13 Positive Personality Traits of Princess Cinderella Worth Developing

13 Positive Personality Traits of Princess Cinderella Worth Developing

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

Cinderella is the most popular princess on Facebook.

I don’t know if want to be the most popular at anything. I do know I want to be the best.

Cinderella is a Positive Role Model
Cinderella is a Positive Role Model

There must be a reason why Cinderella is so popular. Because she has been around the longest maybe? Some other reason?

Here are some personality characteristics of Disney’s number one … on Facebook anyway.

Cheerful – doesn’t matter how badly she is treated by step moms and step sisters, Cinderella remains positive

Sunny – it shows in her facial expressions and in her actions

Hopeful – it’s easy to remain hopeful when things are going well. Cinderella stays positive even when they aren’t.

Optimistic – How do you look up when you have to keep your head down? Cinderella knows.

Patient – life doesn’t always get worse. Sooner or later things have to get better.

Kind – how do you say nice things to people who aren’t nice back? Kind people know how.

Hard work – she got all that cleaning and sewing done and still made it to the ball.

Persevering – never give up, never give up

Related: Snow White’s 15 Positive Personality Characteristics

Strong-willed – kindness and optimism are great outerwear for an internal desire to stay strong.

Determined – discouraged but not defeated.

Caring – when you care for others, there is reciprocation.

Honest – What You See Is What You Get.

Faithful – Having stayed the course, Cinderella met her prince and indeed learned that there can be life happily ever after.

 

 

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Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

China Growth By The Numbers

China Growth By The Numbers

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

wilby-china
China’s Growth

China’s consumer price index rises 4.8% in 2007

The CPI (inflation) was at the highest level in more than 10 years.

GDP expands 11.4 percent, fastest in 13 years

2007 saw a slowdown but the year’s growth was still the fastest in more than a lunar cycle.

China’s fixed asset investment up 24.8% in 2007

Fixed assets were up over 2006 by almost 1%. Overall investment – $1.9 trillion.

China’s online game market hit Y12.8 billion in 2007

The game market was up 66.7% over 2006. Shandra had a market share of 19.3%, Netease had 15.1% and Giant Interactive had 11.9%.

Too late to get started in China?

Hardly. It’s just harder now.

 

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

8 Reasons to Work for General Electric in China

8 Reasons to Work for General Electric in China

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

wilbychina2
China

Everywhere I turn I read about China’s management needs. Businessweek reported the results of a study by McKinsey & Co. that estimates China will need 75,000 managers over the next 10 years but have only 3,000-5,000 who qualify.

One reason – a decade-long Cultural Revolution from 1966-1976. Students of that era..well there were no students. That age group makes up the would-be managers now.

General Electric is one company that is meeting its management needs, for now.

1. Voluntary turnover for execs in China is around 14% – GE is less than half of that.

2. GE dishes out foreign assignments to its workers – to Japan, the US and so on. This, GE, says builds loyalty.

3. GE offers a mentoring/training program to its up and coming managers.

4. GE gives access to its managers in training to the CEO Immelt through dinners and special groups.

5. A good manager in GE China can do in three years what takes five or more in other companies. About 60% of GE’s salaried employees are under 35.

6. GE offers parties, perks and awards to its performers.

7. GE offers a very clear career path.

8. GE has a research and training facility in Shanghai to look for more promising employees.

Turnover is inevitable where people seek out better lives and the light bulbs seem brighter in other areas…but Immelt says “GE is doing its best to make sure their pipeline is full” of replacements.

What do you think about working for GE?Everywhere I turn I read about China’s management needs. Businessweek reported the results of a study by McKinsey & Co. that estimates China will need 75,000 managers over the next 10 years but have only 3,000-5,000 who qualify.

One reason – a decade-long Cultural Revolution from 1966-1976. Students of that era..well there were no students. That age group makes up the would-be managers now.

General Electric is one company that is meeting its management needs, for now.

1. Voluntary turnover for execs in China is around 14% – GE is less than half of that.

2. GE dishes out foreign assignments to its workers – to Japan, the US and so on. This, GE, says builds loyalty.

3. GE offers a mentoring/training program to its up and coming managers.

4. GE gives access to its managers in training to the CEO Immelt through dinners and special groups.

5. A good manager in GE China can do in three years what takes five or more in other companies. About 60% of GE’s salaried employees are under 35.

6. GE offers parties, perks and awards to its performers.

7. GE offers a very clear career path.

8. GE has a research and training facility in Shanghai to look for more promising employees.

Turnover is inevitable where people seek out better lives and the light bulbs seem brighter in other areas…but Immelt says “GE is doing its best to make sure their pipeline is full” of replacements.

What do you think about working for GE?

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.