Introduction – Bill Belew

Introduction – Bill Belew

Bill Belew has raised 2 bi-cultural kids, now 34 and 30. And he and his wife are now parenting a 3rd, Mia, who is 8.

cold-war
Who else here was born during WWII?

I came in on the tail-end of the baby boom behind two older brothers and two older sisters, 3 of which were WWII babies.  Meaning, I am old enough to have been around the block a few times, but young enough to have a few more trips left in me. My name is Bill Belew.

I first went to Asia on Uncle Sam’s dime. After nearly 5 years in the Navy where I eventually served as an Intelligence Officer for a Destroyer Squadron ( I could tell you some secrets, but then I’d have to kill you) I settled in Japan and lived there for almost 20 years. While there I started a language school for Japanese www.svecs.com . It grew to five branches in Japan and one on the west coast of the US. More about all of that in subsequent posts.

I moved back to the states about 5 years ago and now live in the Bay Area of San Jose (Yes, I know the way.) I teach classes f2f for a vocational school and online for a national university.

My wife is from mainland China and holds an MBA from a California State University. We often discuss the differences in culture and business practices among China, the US and Japan. Sound interesting? It is to us. I will share some of those stories and our insights (or lack of) here in this blog. For my part, I will lean heavily into introducing Japan and her ways. If you want to do business with someone, you need to take time to know them….at least that is how it goes in Asia.

I have two boys. The older one, Benjamin, is an award winning professional classical pianist in Japan. The younger one, Micah, is a US National Swim Champion.

I used to run triathlons and ultramarathons. I could also be seen hanging off the side of a mountain…or making my way up it as a rock climber. Now I am on a marathon trip and I try to climb back into shape.

In my free time (what free time?) I write non-fiction short stories. You can see some of them at www.writingup.com/blog/wcbelew .

I look forward to telling you what I know about Asia – Japan, China and Far East Russia in particular. I welcome comments, suggestions and questions. If I don’t know, I will try to find out.

– Bill

Talk to Bill and others about their experiences raising bi-cultural Japanese-American kids.

 

0 thoughts on “Introduction – Bill Belew

  1. Bill, welcome to Know More Media! I’m excited to learn from you.

    One subject I hope you’ll discuss is China’s growing influence on global economics. I’m fascinated by its sheer immensity and the uniqueness of its government. What do you think will lead more business people to look to China for opportunities? For example, the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing will probably open many people’s eyes, among other things, to the awesome business potential China holds.

    Again, looking forward to your posts.

  2. Thank you, Easton for this welcome.

    China is indeed a hot topic and one that I hope to deal with in time.

    I look forward to sharing what I know here and hopefully learning from others.

  3. Bill, great job and nice to see you writing already. Excellent to have you on the team. I’m sure you will keep providing many solid and intriguing posts.

  4. Nischal,
    Thank you for visiting my blog. I am totally interested in your posting about E-commerce in China.
    As you may gather in future postings, though I am knowledgable about China – I have been there many times – north to south, my wife is ‘made in China’, my father-in-law works as a consultant for ISO9000 and such…my expertise lies in Japan where I lived for nearly 20 years.
    I am sure I can learn much from you.

  5. Matthew,
    Thank you for the welcome. I am glad to be here and will surely give it my best.
    Thanks for the intro to KMM!

    Bill

  6. Should I mention being kidnapped by the KGB, an encounter with a witch…being lost in northern Siberia in my running clothes, …and and..

    Thanks for reading, Melissa.

  7. Bill,
    Thank you for your comment! I was in Wuhan a few months back…you can find a couple videos on my site about my trip. I think they are in the 80th post area…hmmmm…do a search on the site for China…I think that will get you to the China stuff…most of the other videos are about Japan and my life in Kyushu…I have lived there for about 8 years, I work in a Medical Lab and teach at Jr. High School. Thanks for dropping me a comment, looking forward to reading your blog! I try to post 3 to 4 videos a week! Since you lived in Japan for such a long time I am sure you can give me some pointers/advice/anything about life in general would be more than welcome!
    Yoroshiku!

  8. Bill,

    Appreciate your visit to “think:lab” recently…and your kind/upbeat words about some of the posts you’ve read through.

    Took some time to visit your blogs in the Know More Media network; great voice you present — humorous, analytical, tangential at the right time, etc. Well worth the discovery!

    I spent a summer teaching English outside of Tokyo years ago; a blink of an eye in comparison to your time there, but your bio brought back memories of that wild adventure!

    Hope to cross blog-paths again one day soon.

    Cheers, Christian

  9. Hi Bill,

    Nice blog. I am a software engineer in China. It is so interesting to see how a foreigner thinks about China. I believe your blog is pretty helpful for people who is doing business in Asian countries. If need any contribution, I will be the volunteer.

    Aaron Li

    lichenlc@gmail.com

  10. Hey there. Thanks for stopping by and the comments over at Unemployed Writer. It led me to a good find in your site, lots of interesting information. As for me, I’m definitely interested in Japanese culture. Huge reader of their literature, and took a couple years of courses in college. And there is of course the requisite film and book collection (hence the top 10 list).

  11. Bill, congratulations for receiving Know More Media’s Incredible Author Award for Nov 2006. You definitely add a tremendous amount of value to this network, and I hope you’ll keep this up.

  12. This topics are very important to me because it is so misunderstood by a lot of people I talk to. Culture is a powerful force which affects the economic processes. As such a force, culture cannot be dismissed or taken lightly in its fundamental role in economic development. I’d like to know more about differences in culture and business practices among China, the US and Japan so I will be checking in here more often to see new articles.

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